Updated and Expanded Biographical Notes 1826 - 1835

The Biographical Notes in Volume One should be disregarded in their entirety.  The data below replaces that in the printed document.
 

Agett, du Bois (1796-1866). Arrived February 1830. A former member of the London stock exchange, he received land grants on the Swan and Avon rivers, but his farming and business ventures in Western Australia failed and he was obliged to become a clerk in the Customs Department. He explored around Mt Bakewell with Dale and Bland in 1831.  Agett was out with Bland again in 1834, exploring the Avon River.

Armstrong, Charles (d.1838). Arrived in the colony with the 21st Regiment as an Ensign. In 1834 he was given charge of the small detachment stationed at the Murray River. He was promoted to Second Lieutenant in 1836. In 1836 he established the military station at Kojonup and was later transferred to the Vasse, where he died of exposure in the bush in the winter of 1838.  Lt Armstrong was not known to be a member of any exploration party but assisted a number of explorers including George Layman during his trip from Augusta in 1834.

Bamber, Captain John. Arrived on the Nancy in 1830 and was granted a Ship Broker’s licence.  He was offered 6,346 acres but declined and left on the Bombay in 1830 for Hobart.  Bamber made an excursion to the Collie River in January 1830.

Bannister, Captain Thomas (1799-1874). A former army officer, he arrived in Western Australia in October 1829, when he accompanied Dr T.B. Wilson and others on an excursion to select land on the Canning River. He was appointed Government Resident at Fremantle in 1830. Later that year he made an expedition to the base of the Darling Range and in the summer of 1830-31 he made an overland expedition from Perth to King George Sound, where he also took up land grants. He had left the colony by 1835, when he was listed as a founding member of the Port Phillip Association (Victoria); but may have returned to Fremantle to engage in sealing at the end of 1837. Thomas was the brother of Saxe Bannister, controversial first Attorney General (1823-1826) of New South Wales.

Barker, Collet (1786-1831).  Captain of the 39th Regiment, he arrived in Sydney in early February 1828. Proving himself an able administrator at the Raffles Bay settlement in northern Australia, Barker was sent south in late 1829 to command the King George Sound settlement. He accompanied Dr T.B. Wilson and Captain Bannister up the Canning River to select land in October 1829. While at King George Sound he made numerous expeditions to surrounding areas. In early 1831, when administration of the settlement at King George Sound was taken over by Western Australia, Barker was ordered back to Sydney. He was killed by Aborigines while exploring the mouth of the Murray (South Australia) on the return voyage. Barker’s Journals of his time at Raffles Bay and King George Sound are full and valuable accounts of those outposts.

Barron, Edward (1796-1863). Arrived on HMS Sulphur as Colour Sergeant of the 63rd Regiment. Upon his discharge in 1834, he and his wife opened the United Services Hotel in Perth. He joined the Police and was a member of J.R. Phillips’ Hotham Expedition of 1835.  Barron later took up land near Williams.

Baxter, William. A botanist who collected specimens in Kangaroo Island in 1823 and at King George Sound, Cape Arid and Lucky Bay between December 1828 and July 1829.   Baxter collected on behalf of the Sydney Botanic Gardens and for private collections.  In a letter T.B. Wilson wrote to the Commandant at King George Sound in 1829 it was indicated that Baxter had explored to the east and/or north east of the settlement.

Beguin (also known as Begooin, Begine, Benguin and Begungoort). An Aboriginal man of Upper Swan region. Accompanied G.F. Moore on his expedition to the northward of Swan River in April 1835.

Belches, Peter (1796-1890). As the 3rd Lieutenant on HMS Success, he accompanied Stirling on his March 1827 exploration of the Swan River. He was the Albany Harbour Master from 1834 to 1837.  Belches took up land at Albany, Plantagenet and Toodyay.  He accompanied Patrick Taylor and others on an expedition to the north west of Albany in 1835.  He was with Roe on an expedition to Doubtful Island Bay later in the year.

Blackwood, Francis Price (1809-54). The second son of Vice Admiral Sir Henry Blackwood, by his third wife, Harriet. He entered the Royal Navy in 1821 and was promoted to Lieutenant in August 1828 and Commander in November 1830. Blackwood was appointed to HMS Hyacinth in early 1833 and visited Western Australia with that vessel in 1834. He received the rank of Captain in 1838.

Bland, Rivett Henry (1811-94). Arrived in August 1829. He explored around Mt Bakewell in 1831 and the Avon River with Agett in 1834.  He was granted land at York, where he served as Government Stockkeeper. Bland was a member of Roe’s party that explored the Hay and Sleeman Rivers in February 1835. Later the same month he accompanied John Molloy on an excursion in the vicinity of the Vasse.  In 1842 he became Government Resident at York and then served in the same capacity at Albany, 1846-48. Moving to Perth, he became Clerk to the Legislative Council and, in 1849-50, Acting Colonial Secretary. After a visit to Britain he returned to Australia in late 1853 to become involved in gold mining in Victoria. His Clunes Quartz Mining Company made him wealthy and for several years he served as a director of the National Bank.

Boyd, Charles (1797-1835). A retired army officer who arrived in the colony in February 1830. Supposed to have operated a lighter service on the Swan and by late 1830 had apparently obtained a grant near Guildford. Alleged to have died of excessive drinking.

Brockman, William Locke (1802-72). Arrived with wife and eldest child in January 1830. Took up land at Herne Hill on Upper Swan but suffered severe losses from bushfires in January 1832, after which he leased Woodbridge, Stirling’s grant at Guildford. He accompanied Dale on his August 1830 expedition into the Darling Range.

Broun (Brown), Peter Nicholas (1797-1846). Brother of Richard. Broun arrived on the Parmelia in June 1829 to serve as the colony’s first Colonial Secretary. He obtained land on the Upper Swan (opposite Ellen’s Brook – later Ellenbrook) and at Bassendean.

Broun (Brown), Richard McBryde (1801-58). Brother of Peter. He arrived in March 1831 and in May of that year was appointed Government Registrar and Collector of Revenue after the death William Stirling, the former Registrar.  Granted land on the Avon and accompanied Roe across the Darling Range in late 1832.

Browne, John. Accompanied Major Lockyer on the expedition from Sydney to King George Sound and was appointed as gardener to the settlement.  Browne died of ‘inflammation of the liver’ and was buried on 29 May 1827.

Bryan, Samuel Burnham (1794-1862). A graduate of Dublin University, in 1822 he settled in Van Diemen’s Land, where he received a grant of 2200 acres near Launceston. Arriving in Western Australia in 1830 to select land, Bryan accompanied John Henty across the Darling Range in October 1830 and went with W.K. Shenton and Stephen Henty to the Leschenault in late January 1831. He returned to Van Diemen’s Land, where he married Jane Henty in October 1832, and later settled in the Port Phillip District.

Bull, Henry (b.1799). Entered the Royal Navy in December 1813.  Bull served in the West Indies and South America and rose to Lieutenant before he retired in 1829. He arrived in Western Australia in 1830 to take up land grants on Canning and Swan Rivers. He accompanied G.F. Moore on his expedition to the northward of Swan River in April 1835. He was also a member of the Hotham Expedition. Bull became the Government Resident at Bunbury in 1838 and a Member of the Executive Council in 1841. He apparently left the colony after appointing agents in 1848.

Burges, Lockier (c1813-1886). Arrived 1830 on the Warrior with brothers William and Samuel. He was probably the ‘Burges’ mentioned as being a member of Hillman’s expedition to the Hotham and Williams rivers in early 1835.

Burges, Samuel Evans (c1810-85). Arrived in 1830 aboard the Warrior with brothers William and Lockier. Burges was a pastoralist at Upper Swan and York. He was a member of Hillman’s expedition to the Hotham and Williams rivers in early 1835.

Burges, William (c1807-76). Arrived in 1830 aboard the Warrior with brothers Samuel and Lockier. Burges was a pastoralist at Upper Swan and York. In 1850 he moved to Champion Bay, where he served as Resident Magistrate 1851-1860.

Burke, Francis (1802-1830). A private in the 63rd Regiment. Burke was employed in the Survey Office and accompanied Robert Dale on his expedition to trace the Helena River in December 1829.

Burke, Walter. A private in the 63rd Regiment. Burke was employed in the Survey Office and accompanied Robert Dale on his expedition to trace the Helena River in December 1829. He was later stationed at Augusta where he became mentally ill and, while returning to Perth aboard HMS Sulphur, he jumped overboard and drowned in Cockburn Sound on 24 April 1831.

Bussell, Alfred Pickmore (1816-83). Arrived with his brothers John, Charles and Vernon in March 1830. They settled at Augusta that year but moved to the Vasse and Cattle Chosen in 1834. He was with Molloy, soldiers from the 63rd Regiment and his brother John on an expedition from Augusta to Vasse in January 1833.  Alfred was an MLC 1870-74.

Bussell, Elizabeth (Bessie) (b.1818). Arrived 1833 on the Cygnet with sister Fanny and brother Lennox. They joined their older brothers at Augusta.  She made an expedition with her brothers from Augusta to the Vasse in November 1835. Bessie married Henry Ommanney and left for London with family on the Unicorn in 1847.

Bussell, John Garrett (1803-75). Arrived with three younger brothers, Charles, Vernon and Alfred, in March 1830. Bussell settled at Augusta that year but later moved to the Vasse and, eventually, Margaret River. He made numerous expeditions in the Augusta-Vasse area.  In March 1831 he made an expedition from Augusta to Perth. He was an MLC 1870-72.

Bussell, Lennox (1810-1845). Arrived 1833 aboard the Cygnet with sisters Fanny and Bessie and joined their brothers at Augusta. Lennox was appointed a member of the Executive Council in 1841.

Bussell, Vernon (John Vernon) (1813-1860). Arrived on the Warrior 1830 with brothers John, Charles and Alfred. Held 20,000 acres pastoral lease at the Blackwood 1850. He was a foundation member of the Vasse Company formed in 1849 to export timber to England.

Butler, John (1794-1847). Arrived in January 1830 with his wife, three children and several servants. Selected land at Freshwater Bay and on the Avon.  Butler ran the Bush Inn (also known as the Half Way House) on the Perth-Fremantle road. In March 1834 he made a 35 mile (56 kilometre) expedition north of Perth in search of strayed cattle.  He left for New South Wales in 1836.

Byrne, Francis Henry (b.1798). A former Army Captain who arrived with his wife and two infant daughters in 1830 – both children died soon after arrival. Byrne obtained a grant on the Swan, which he named Belmont, and subsequently leased to one of his servants, John Hancock. He also had grants on the Murray and Toodyay. Byrne left the colony in September 1838.

Camfield, Henry (1799-1872). Arrived at Swan River in late 1829 and took up property called Burrswood, across the river east of Perth. Camfield accompanied Dale east of the Avon in late 1830. An associate of the Hentys in the 1830s, he accompanied Stephen Henty and Roe on the Sally Ann expedition to Doubtful Island Bay in late 1835. In 1845 he became Postmaster General and in 1848 was appointed Resident Magistrate at Albany, a position he occupied for 12 years.

Chapman, George (c.1809), Henry (1805-59) and James (1803-70). Arrived with their sister in February 1830 and settled at Augusta before later moving to Busselton.

Cheyne, George. Arrived in 1831 on the Sterling to take up land at Albany, adding to his holdings in 1836 with land at Cape Riche. He joined Baron von Hugel on an expedition up the Kalgan River in 1834. He was with Roe on an expedition to the Hay and Sleeman rivers in February 1835 and was with Roe again in December 1835 on a trip to Doubtful Bay.  A trader, whaler and agriculturalist, he opened Albany’s first flour mill in 1858. He retired to Scotland about 1860.

Clarkson, Michael (1805?-71). Brother of James, they were members of a party of Methodists who arrived in the colony in February 1830 on the Tranby. Their family had strong links to the British anti-slavery movement – their father being related by marriage to William Wilberforce. Michael accompanied Dale on his second expedition east of the Darling Range.

Clarkson, James (1806-72). Brother of Michael, they were members of a party of Methodists who arrived in the colony in February 1830 aboard the Tranby. Building on land grants obtained on the Swan and the Avon, the brothers and Michael’s sons became successful pastoralists in various parts of the colony.

Clause, Frederick Rushbrook. Appointed a Naval Surgeon on 15 September 1813. Clause joined HMS Success in February 1826 and served on her until August 1828. He was a member of Stirling’s expedition to the Swan River in 1827. He was still on the Navy List in 1841, but was by then classed as unfit for active service.

Clint, Raphael (1797-1849). Arrived 5 August 1829 on the Calista. Clint was appointed as clerk to the Surveyor General in October 1829 and he was soon enlisted to carry out survey work, even though unqualified and having little knowledge of surveying. He made a trip to the Porongorups in December 1831, and then explored Wilsons Inlet in early January 1832 before accompanying Dale to the Stirling Range later in January 1832. In 1832 he married and left for Tasmania where he worked as surveyor in Tasmania until dismissed over his wife’s illicit trafficking with soldiers. He went to Sydney where he worked as an engraver until his death.

Collie, Alexander (1793-1835). Appointed a Naval Surgeon in 1815, Collie arrived with HMS Sulphur in June 1829. He explored south-west rivers with Preston before being appointed first Resident Magistrate of Albany when the King George Sound settlement came under Western Australian control in 1831. He undertook further explorations in the vicinity of King George Sound before taking up the position of Colonial Surgeon in Perth in 1832. With his health rapidly deteriorating from tuberculosis, Collie decided to return to England but, too ill to travel further, he was taken off the ship at Albany, where he died.

Craigie, John (b.1803). Arrived at Albany in June 1834. It was probably this Craigie who accompanied Roe’s party from King George Sound to York in late 1835.

Cudlip, Frederick Augustus (b.1809). Entered Royal Navy in 1824. Cudlip was a midshipman on HMS Sulphur. He was a member of Preston and Collie’s expedition in whale boats to Geographe in November 1829.  Cudlip was promoted to Lieutenancy in 1840, and to 2nd Lieutenant in 1843.

Cumwhite. Aborigine encountered by Barker near Denmark in February 1830.

Currie, Jane Eliza (b.1794). Wife of Captain Mark Currie. Her diary and several paintings are a valuable record of the early Swan River settlement.

Currie, Mark John (1795-1874). Entered Royal Navy in 1808, when he met and served with James Stirling. Both youths served under Sir Henry Blackwood, to whom Currie later (1827-28) became secretary when Sir Henry was Commander in Chief at the Nore Command (a naval station at the mouth of the River Thames and one of the most important commands for the defence of the United Kingdom).  Currie arrived as a settler with his wife and servants on the Parmelia in June 1829. He made three expeditions to the south in 1829. He served as Postmaster and Harbour Master but was also a Commissioner of the Board of Audit and Control, which dealt with settlers’ applications for land grants. He obtained grants at Redcliffe and Matilda Bay but departed on HMS Sulphur in August 1832 to resume his naval career.

Dale, Robert (1810-53). Born in Derbyshire, Dale was the great-nephew of General Dyott, commander of the 63rd Regiment. He arrived as an ensign of that regiment in June 1829, on HMS Sulphur. He explored the Canning and Helena rivers and led the first expedition over the Darling Range. Stirling rewarded his services with land grants on the Swan and Avon rivers. A tributary of the Avon was named in his honour. Dale explored the Stirling Range with Raphael Clint in December 1831. In all Dale led nine expeditions in various parts of the colony and was a member of several more. In October 1833 he returned to Britain, where he resigned his commission to become a timber merchant in Liverpool. An advocate of Western Australia’s potential, he actively promoted the use of jarrah in shipbuilding. He died from tuberculosis.

Dance, William Townsend. Entered Royal Navy in 1806. Dance served on the West India, Lisbon, North American and Brazilian stations. He was Commander of HMS Sulphur when he arrived in the Swan River Colony in June 1829. Dance accompanied Captain Fremantle on his expedition up the Canning River in July 1829.  His wife, Helena, famously, cut down a tree to mark the establishment of Perth. He left for England in August 1832.

Davis, Doctor Robert. An Assistant Surgeon with a detachment of the 39th Regiment under Captain Collet Barker. Davis arrived at King George Sound in late 1829 and left with Barker in March 1831.

Dawson, Richard. A sergeant of the 63rd Regiment who arrived in June 1829 on HMS Sulphur. Dawson was sent to Augusta in charge of a small detachment and appointed Deputy Harbour Master there in May 1830. He returned to Perth in 1832 to serve as Sheriff before returning to England in 1833.

Delmage, Julius (b.1798). A corporal of 21st Regiment. He arrived 1833 from Tasmania and was a member of the party that journeyed with Stirling and Roe to the Murray River and back in October 1834.  Delmage departed for India in 1840, leaving his eldest son, Jacob, then aged 20, in the colony.

Denmark, Doctor Alexander. A surgeon at the Haslar Naval Hospital in Hampshire, England during the Napoleonic Wars.  Doctor and traveller, T.B. Wilson, dedicated his doctoral thesis to Denmark.

Dewar, John (c1783-1854). Arrived with wife and eight children in March 1830, as servants of James Woodward Turner at Augusta. He accompanied Bussell on a trip from Augusta to Perth in March 1831. By 1832 he had moved back to Perth and taken up a smallholding at Upper Swan. Dewar was a mailman at Toodyay in 1845.

Dinneen, Dennis (c.1807). A convict at King George Sound, born in Cork, Ireland. He was speared by Aborigines on 27 December 1826 and returned to Sydney on board HMS Success in April 1827.

Disney, Disney C. Joined Royal Navy in December 1807. Disney was a midshipman on HMS Sulphur. He was a member of Lieutenant Preston’s party that attempted to cross the Darling Range in September 1829. Disney retired as a lieutenant on half pay in June 1851.

Dobbins, James. A private of the 63rd Regiment, who arrived on HMS Sulphur in June 1829. His wife, Jean, was speared and wounded by Aborigines on the Canning in late 1832. He was one of the mounted policemen at Pinjarra in October 1834. Dobbins was second in command of Hillman’s party to the Hotham and Williams in January 1835. He took over the United Services Tavern in Perth in 1835 and left the colony in 1845.

Dodds, James (c1785-1857). Arrived 1830 on the Rockingham. He selected 40 acres at Guildford and 2000 acres at Avon. Dodds lightered goods from Rockingham to the Swan River during the 1830s.

Dring, David. Arrived on the Egyptian 1831. He obtained land at Upper Swan and then on the Avon. He visited New South Wales in 1835. Dring was part owner and master of the schooner Elizabeth. He discovered the mouth of the Hutt River while on a voyage to Gantheaume Bay in 1840.

Drummond, James (1784-1863). Arrived June 1829 on the Parmelia with his wife and children. He accompanied Mark Currie and Dr Charles Simmons southward of Fremantle in July-August 1829. Drummond was the Government Naturalist (without pay). He was appointed to establish the government garden on Garden Island and another at Peninsula Farm on the Swan River. He selected and resigned many different grants along the Swan and Helena rivers before settling on land at Toodyay. His collection of 48,000 plant specimens became the basis of Western Australian botanical studies.

Durabab (also known as Dulebub, Dombob, Doolup, Doorbup, Dulebup, Dulibub and Duribub). He was an Aboriginal man from Upper Swan who accompanied Nathaniel Shaw when he examined the Darling Range north of the York road in May 1835. A few days later was accused of being involved in the spearing of two white men at the Halfway House on the York Road. He was accused of other depredations against the whites in the following years. Durabab was shot and wounded by a white man in April 1838 and in December of that year was fatally speared after a long round of retributive killings. He was the brother of Weneet.

Dyott, General William. General and Colonel in Chief of the 63rd Regiment, he was Robert Dale’s great uncle (Dale’s grandmother being Dyott’s sister). Dale’s father, Thurston was Dyott’s Aide-de-Camp during the Napoleonic Wars.

Earl, George Samuel Windsor (1813-65). Arrived in early 1830 and later that year became the Government Resident’s clerk at Augusta, where he also held the position of Pilot and Harbour Master. In early 1832 Earl sailed a small boat to Fremantle in order to alert Governor Stirling that the community at Augusta was in need of urgent assistance. Disenchanted with Western Australia, Earl left for Java in August 1832. A well-known advocate of British settlement in northern Australia, he was attached to the Port Essington settlement between 1838 and 1844.

Edwards, Robert Virtue (c.1806). An Assistant Surveyor appointed in England by Sir George Murray in a letter dated 25 October 1830. He arrived in 1831 on the Atwick and was promptly sent to Augusta to replace John Kellam. He joined John Bussell and others on an expedition from Augusta to the Vasse in November 1831.  In October 1832 he again accompanied Bussell from Augusta to the Vasse.  Edwards complained bitterly about conditions at Augusta and resigned in November 1832. He left the colony in 1833 on the Imogene.

Eliot, George (1816-95). Arrived in 1829 with Stirling, to whom he was distantly related. Eliot served as clerk to Stirling and later as Resident Magistrate in Bunbury, Geraldton and Albany. He went on an expedition to King George Sound in October 1835 with Stirling, Roe and others.

Ellis, Theophilus Tighe (1782-1834). A retired army Captain who arrived in May 1830. Resident Magistrate at Kelmscott in 1830 and assisted in the formation of mounted force to protect settlers. He became Superintendent of Native Tribes in 1833 and took part in the clash at Pinjarra in October 1834. Wounded in the action, he died of his wounds in November.

Erskine, Archibald (d.1848). A lieutenant of the 63rd Regiment, he arrived in 1830 and explored the Avon region in September that year. Erskine was stationed in the Murray District, where he received a land grant. He was promoted to Captain, and left with his regiment for India in 1834.

Everard, William (b.1795). A Royal Navy Lieutenant on half-pay who arrived in October 1829 and selected land. Everard was with Dr T.B. Wilson and others on an excursion up the Canning River in October 1829.  He left for Van Diemen’s Land in March 1830.

Fellow(e)s, Thomas (c.1801). Born Warwick, England. Fellowes was a convict, possibly transferred from the Raffles Bay settlement. He accompanied Dr T.B. Wilson on his expedition north-west of King George Sound in December 1829. He escaped in January 1830, was recaptured and sent back in September 1830. He escaped again February 1831 and was not recaptured.

Festing, Lieutenant Colson. Entered Royal Navy September 1807. He transferred from HMS Fly to command the Amity, which transported Major Lockyer’s party to Albany. Festing was promoted Commander in 1838 and Captain in 1853.  He married Margaret Marwood in December 1842.

Flinders, Captain Matthew (1774-1814). Born Lincolnshire, England. From 1801-1803 Flinders became the first British Naval Officer to circumnavigate Australia. On his return journey to England he stopped at Mauritius and was imprisoned by the French for eight years before being freed to continue his journey home where, in failing health, he prepared his manuscript.  It was published the day before he died as A Voyage to Terra Australis.

Fraser (or Frazer), Charles (1788?-1831). A private of the 46th Regiment he arrived in New South Wales on the Guildford in 1816. He served as the botanical collector on several of Oxley’s expeditions as well as accompanying Allan Cunningham, the King’s Botanist, on a number of the latter’s expeditions. Fraser was formally appointed Government Botanist in 1821. He accompanied James Stirling to Swan River in March 1827. His report was instrumental in persuading the British Government to allow settlement in Western Australia.

Fremantle, Charles Howe (1800-69). Second son of Vice Admiral Sir Thomas Fremantle. He entered the Royal Navy in 1812. Fremantle arrived at Swan River in late April 1829 as Captain of HMS Challenger to take possession of Western Australia and prepare the way for James Stirling, who arrived with the Parmelia on 1 June. Fremantle and his men conducted some explorations of the Swan and Canning rivers and the nearby coast before departing in late August 1829. Apart from a brief call at the port of Fremantle in 1832, he did not return to the colony. He received the rank of Captain in 1826, Rear Admiral in 1854, Vice Admiral in 1860 and Admiral in 1864.

Friend, Matthew Garling (1792-1871). A Royal Navy captain on half pay. Friend arrived in 1830 on the Wanstead of which he was the owner and captain. He was granted 5,000 acres in the Murray District and placed it in charge of his brother when he settled in Tasmania. His grant was resumed in 1841 for non-fulfilment of improvement duties.

Gal(lo)way, John (c.1795). Arrived on the William in mid-1830 from Van Diemen’s Land as a servant to Samuel Bryan. Galloway was listed as a labourer in December 1830 when he accompanied Thomas Bannister to King George Sound. In late 1832 he was working as a splitter and fencer at Upper Swan, where he was again mentioned in February 1838.

Garling, Frederick (1806-73). A marine and landscape painter who arrived in New South Wales with his parents in August 1815. Garling served as the official artist on HMS Success during Stirling’s 1827 visit to Swan River and King George Sound. On his return to Sydney he became a customs official.

Geear (also known as Gear, Gier and Obediah). An Aboriginal man of Upper Swan region. He accompanied G.F. Moore on his expedition to the northward of Swan River in April 1835.

Gigat (also known as Cogat, Coket, Cookuth, Gogat and Nagat). Aboriginal man of Gingin area north of Upper Swan. He hosted a corroboree for G.F. Moore and his party during their expedition to the northward of Swan River in April 1835.

Gilbert, Augustus H. Arrived in the colony in June 1829 on HMS Sulphur. Gilbert was with Preston and others who tried to cross the Darling Range in September 1829.

Gilbert, W.C. Listed as James Stirling’s clerk during his 1827 visit to Swan River, and therefore apparently the author of the first-hand account of that expedition. However, the manuscript bears the name ‘Augustus H. Gilbert’ – who may have been the addressee and a close relative, perhaps a brother.

Gellibrand, William (d.1840). Sailed to the Swan River Colony from Tasmania aboard the Orelia in August 1829.  He returned in March 1830 on the Wanstead and obtained town allotments at the Swan River and a 12,000 acre grant at the Collie River. He appointed Charles Smith as his agent. On his death the Government resumed the grants because the required improvements were not fulfilled.

Goodbacan. Aboriginal woman met en route to York.

Gough, W. A private of the 39th Regiment and veteran of the Peninsula War who accompanied Dr T.B. Wilson on his exploration northwest of King George Sound in December 1829. Gough was mentioned on numerous occasions in Collet Barker’s diary during 1830 and early 1831, including an expedition to Wilson Inlet in February 1830.

Gr(a)inger, John (1802-79). A servant of Thomas Bannister, he arrived in October 1829 and accompanied Bannister on the arduous journey to King George Sound in the summer of 1830-31.

Green, Alfred (1805-95). A doctor who arrived in March 1830, when he was appointed Assistant Colonial Surgeon. In 1831 Green was at Augusta and, later the same year, moved to the Vasse.  He joined John Bussell and others on an expedition from Augusta to the Vasse in October 1832. By the mid-1850s he was the Residential Medical Officer at Toodyay, and later moved to Northam.

Gregory, Joshua (1792-1838). An Army Captain on half pay, Gregory arrived with his family in October 1829. He obtained fairly large land grants on the Canning and Avon rivers and purchased Rainsworth on the Swan from Agett. His sons, notably Augustus, Francis and Henry, became surveyors and explorers.

Griffin, George. A lieutenant of Royal Marines on HMS Challenger. Griffin accompanied Captain Currie, James Drummond and Dr Simmons on an expedition southward of Fremantle in July-August 1929. He was promoted to Captain of Royal Marines in 1837.

Grimes, Private Thomas. A soldier of the 63rd Regiment and orderly to James Stirling.  Grimes accompanied Roe on an expedition to the north and west of King George Sound in December 1831.

Hardey, John Wall (1802-85) and Joseph (1804-75). Brothers who were in the party of Methodists who arrived on the Tranby in early 1830. The brothers held land in partnership on the Swan (Peninsula Farm) and near York. While John was a MLC for most years between 1849 and 1870, Joseph was influential in Church administration and Education.

Harris, Dr Joseph (1789-1846). Arrived in the colony in January 1833. Harris selected land on the Swan and Avon. He accompanied Hillman on his January 1835 expedition to the Hotham and Williams rivers and published an account of this journey in the Perth Gazette. Harris was Acting Colonial Surgeon in October 1835.

Harris, Joseph Strelley (1813-89). Son of Dr Joseph Harris (1789-1846). He arrived in the Swan River Colony with his parents in 1833. He drove stock from Swan to Avon and suffered heavy losses from poison plants, which, with Drummond, he helped identify. Strelley pioneered the droving of sheep from Albany to the Avon/Swan districts. He was Acting Resident Magistrate at Williams in 1840 and Magistrate at Toodyay 1850-1860 and then in the Vasse District.

Heal, William (1782-1845). Arrived in Western Australia in January 1830 and selected land at Northam.  He joined Dale on his expedition north and south of Mt Bakewell in September 1831.

Heathcote, George Gage (1806-1854). Son of Admiral Henry Heathcote. Heathcote was a midshipman on HMS Success when it visited Swan River in April 1827.

Heff(e)ron, Patrick (1803-88). A private of the 63rd Regiment, he arrived on HMS Sulphur in June 1829. Hefferon transferred to the 21st Regiment and remained in Western Australia with the change of regiments in 1833. He took part in the Battle of Pinjarra and accompanied G.F. Moore north to the river he named the Moore in 1836. He accompanied Roe on the 1835 expedition to and from King George Sound. Hefferon served as a policeman at Albany and Murray District.

Henry, John. Entered Royal Navy in 1808. Henry saw extensive action in the Napoleonic Wars and was briefly captured by the French at Mauritius in 1810. He was a second Lieutenant on HMS Challenger. He led a party to explore the Canning River in June 1829 and then a few weeks later was with Captain Fremantle on a similar expedition. He was working as an Emigration Agent in Dublin in 1849, although he remained a lieutenant on half pay.

Henty, John (1813-68). A member of the family famous for establishing the settlement at Portland, Victoria in late 1834. John was the brother of Stephen and James. He arrived in Western Australia in late 1829 and took charge of the family grant of 300 acres near Albany in 1831. He joined his brothers in Van Diemen’s Land in 1833.

Henty, Stephen George (1811-72). Brother of John and James. Stephen Henty arrived in Western Australia in late 1829 and traded between Van Diemen’s Land and the Swan River Colony until 1836. He owned the Sally Ann, and was a member of the party accompanying Roe on that vessel to explore Doubtful Island Bay in late 1835.

Hillman, Alfred (1807-1883). Appointed as Draftsman by Sir George Murray, Hillman arrived in Western Australia in April 1831. He was appointed Assistant Surveyor in Albany in October 1832 to replace Raphael Clint. He was responsible for exploring and surveying much of the Perth-Albany road. In 1854 he was first Assistant Surveyor, Draftsman and Lithographer. He constantly complained about the volume of work. Hillman was demoted to Recordkeeper in January 1863, and left the Survey Office later that year to become Sheriff. He retired in 1873. Died in London.

Hobbs, John (b.1794). Master of the Thompson, which brought Captain Collet Barker and a detachment of the 39th Regiment from Raffles Bay to Fremantle, from where they proceeded on the Amity to King George Sound. In late October 1829 he accompanied Barker and Captain Bannister on an excursion to explore the Canning and select land grants.

Hugel, Baron Charles von (1795-1870). Attended the University of Heidelberg as a law student. Joined the army about 1814. Some time after 1826, and after a failed romance, he started his world travels. He explored Garden and Carnac islands in December 1833 and short time later (January 1834) he made an expedition to the Kalgan River with George Cheyne, George Lambert and others. He held many diplomatic posts in his later years and in 1849 received the medal of the Royal Geographical Society.

Hughes, Private Thomas. A soldier of the 63rd Regiment. Hughes arrived in HMS Sulphur with his wife and child. He was at Leschenault in 1830. He accompanied Roe on an expedition north and west of King George Sound in December 1831. Hughes transferred to Augusta by 1831.

Hunt, Thomas. Arrived in the colony in February 1830. Hunt was second-in-command to H.M. Ommanney on the Monkey expedition northwards to investigate a shipwreck July-September 1834.

Ionan. An Aborigine who guided Roe’s party to Moorilup, Hay and Sleeman rivers, near King George Sound, in early 1835.

Irwin, Frederick Chidley (1788-1860). Arrived on HMS Sulphur in June 1829, as Captain and commanding officer of the 63rd Regiment. Irwin was granted land at Upper Swan with his cousin W.H. Mackie. He was Acting Lieutenant Governor 1832-33. He left with his regiment in 1833 but returned in 1838 as Commandant of Troops. Irwin was appointed Lieutenant Governor and served as Acting Governor 1847-48.

Jay, William Taylor. Apparently left England as a ‘black sheep’. Jay arrived and departed on the Wanstead in 1830. In February 1830 Jay and two others made a journey from Fremantle to Leschenault and return. He married fellow Wanstead passenger Miss Mary Anne (or Marianne) Laird on arriving in Hobart, Tasmania. He departed for New South Wales shortly thereafter and settled in Newcastle, where he became a schoolmaster.

Jecks, Isaac (b.1801). Arrived in August 1829 to open a store and an inn at Fremantle. Jecks grew grapes at Mt Eliza, Perth. He obtained grant of land on Swan. In December 1829 he was joined by his nephew, Thomas (1814-56), who lived at Guildford. Isaac left the colony in 1845, leaving Thomas in charge of his business interests.

Jones, Walter (1777-1868). Arrived with several sons in February 1830 as a servant of Charles Boyd. Jones was a tenant farmer at Woodbridge, Guildford.  He also opened an inn there. He accompanied Francis Whitfield to trace the Helena River in March 1833.

Kal-yute. An Aboriginal of the Southwest Region.

Kearney (Kenny), Private John (1808-1883). A private of 63rd Regiment.  Kearney accompanied Collie and Preston to Geographe Bay in November 1829.  He was also with Bussell on a trip from the Blackwood to the Vasse in November 1831. He served as a police officer 1853-58. Kearney retired in the colony.

Kellam, John (1801-41). Arrived in October 1829 to join his brother Henry (1810-38), who had a land grant at Augusta. Kellam was appointed the Assistant Surveyor there on 1 April 1830.  He accompanied Molloy on his explorations of the lower Blackwood. R.V. Edwards arrived in Augusta on 27 September 1831 to replace him and Kellam, together with Ludlow and Welbourne, left the same day to walk to Perth.

Kent, John. Came from Raffles Bay with Barker to serve as Storekeeper at King George Sound, were he was stationed from late 1829 until the withdrawal of 39th Regiment in March 1831. Kent accompanied Dr Wilson on his December 1829 expedition to Mt Barker area and Captain Barker on his February 1831 expedition to Wilson Inlet.

Keppel, Hon. Thomas Robert. A midshipman on HMS Success when she visited Swan River in 1827, although he does not appear to have taken part in any land exploration at that time. His diary of the journey is available at Battye Library Private Archives, Acc 1585A.

Kerr, Private William. A private of the 63rd Regiment. Kerr accompanied J.G. Bussell on his expedition from Augusta to the Vasse in November 1831.

King Knackana, see Nakinna.

King, Captain Philip Parker. Born Norfolk Island and went to England in 1796.  King joined the Royal Navy in 1807. He was promoted to Lieutenant in 1814. King returned to Australia and circumnavigated the continent on three occasions (with J.S. Roe, A. Cunningham and others in the Mermaid and Bathurst), each time adding more to the known coastline.  The first Australian to gain international repute.

Knight, Stephen Henry (1801-81). Arrived on the Parmelia in June 1829. Knight accompanied Preston and Dale to Darling Range in September 1829. He was employed by the Government on Garden Island and in Perth. From 1839 he was at Albany where he held various Government positions.

Layman, George (1810-1841). Arrived per Orelia 1829 via Van Diemen’s Land after having worked his passage to the Swan River Colony. Layman settled first in Augusta and in March 1831 he helped erected the first barracks there. He was murdered by natives at the Vasse in February 1841.

Leake, George (1786-1849). A merchant who arrived in August 1829 and took up large tracts of land. Leake financed many settlers and was a Director of the Western Australia Bank from 1837. He was a Member of the Legislative Council from 1839 until his death.

Lennard, Edward Pomeroy Barrett (1799-1878). Arrived 1829 and received land grants on Swan and Avon rivers. Lennard accompanied G.F. Moore on his expedition to the northward of Swan River in April 1835.

Lewis, John (1793-1841). Arrived in the colony in December 1831 to serve as Commissary General and, from February 1832, as Treasurer. His difficulties with his public duties led to suicide.

Liddon, M. An overseer of Sir Richard Spencer’s sheep station near Albany. As Liddon was Lady Spencer’s maiden name, this man was probably her relative.

Lockyer, Ensign Edmond. Son of Major Edmond Lockyer. He was an ensign of the 57th Regiment though temporarily seconded to the 39th Regiment while appointed as Storekeeper to the King George Sound Settlement. Lockyer returned to Sydney via the Isabella, and sailed with his regiment to India in 1831. He returned to Australia and died in Brisbane.

Lockyer, Major Edmond (1784-1860). After service in India and Ceylon, arrived in New South Wales as Major of 57th Regiment in August 1824. In 1825, Lockyer explored the Brisbane River and discovered coal near present day Ipswich. In late 1826 Governor Darling sent Lockyer to King George Sound. Sailing on the Amity, with 20 soldiers and 23 convict labourers, he arrived on Christmas Day 1826. Leaving Captain Wakefield in charge of the new settlement (which would become Albany), Lockyer returned to Sydney aboard HMS Success in April 1827. He resigned his commission and remained in New South Wales, holding various government posts as well as engaging in pastoral and mining ventures.

Lovegrove, Thomas. A convict at the Penal Settlement of King George Sound.  Lovegrove accompanied Captain Collet Barker on his exploration of the Wilson Inlet area in February 1830 and was out with Kent in June of the same year.

Ludlow, Frederick (b.1796). He and his wife Mildred arrived on the Parmelia in June 1829 as servants of Captain Currie. In 1830 they went to Augusta with Molloy. In the winter of 1834 Ludlow walked to Perth from Augusta, following the coast.

MacDermott, Marshall (c1793-1877). A former Captain of the 8th Regiment, MacDermott had served in the Caribbean and North America during the Napoleonic Wars. He was shot in the throat at the battle of Plattsburgh. In the early 1820s he was on the Ionian Islands, where he was briefly acquainted with Lord Byron, claiming that Byron died on his portable brass bedstead after having entrusted him with the last three cantos of ‘Don Juan’. He met Captains Molloy and Byrne in Dublin and in partnership with them bought a ship and arrived in Western Australia in June 1830. After losses in farming, he started the first bank in Western Australia with George Leake and others. In 1846, after the amalgamation of that bank with the Bank of Australasia he accepted the management of the South Australian branch.

McKay, John (1810-38). A private of the 21st Regiment. McKay was apparently the soldier ‘Mackey’ who accompanied the Monkey expedition in the winter of 1834.

Mackie, William Henry (1799-1860). A cousin of Captain F.C. Irwin, Mackie arrived in October 1829 and selected land on Upper Swan and Avon rivers. He was Chairman of Quarter Sessions in 1830, an MLC 1831, Advocate-General 1832-34 and then Commissioner of Civil Court until retiring in 1857.

McKnoe, Joseph William (c.1801). Arrived in the colony in February 1830. McKnoe accompanied H.G. Smith on his expedition to Northam in October 1834. He later served as a police constable.

McLeod, Donald Hume. An ensign of 63rd Regiment.  McLeod arrived on HMS Sulphur in June 1829. He was placed in charge of a detachment of his regiment at Augusta. He accompanied Alfred Hillman on the Albany-Nornalup expedition in July 1833. McLeod appears to have left the colony in the late 1830s.

Manyan. An Aboriginal man from the vicinity of Kalgan River. Roe encountered him in February 1835 during an expedition north of King George Sound.

Manyat (also known as Captain). An Aboriginal of King George Sound. He accompanied Collie in May 1832 on his expedition north-west of King George Sound and was with Roe on the Doubtful Island Bay expedition of late 1835. Manyat was brought to Perth for a visit in January 1833.

Meares, Richard Goldsmith (1780-1862). A retired cavalry Captain who served in the Napoleonic Wars. Meares arrived as one of Peel’s immigrants in December 1829. He held a large amount of land. Meares accompanied Stirling to Pinjarra in October 1834. He was Resident Magistrate for the Murray District in 1840-41.

Meares, Seymour (1817-92). Son of Captain Meares. He accompanied his father and Stirling to Pinjarra in October 1834.

Migo (also known as Mago, Maiago, Miago and Myago). He appears in European records in 1833 as an associate of Yagan. He is thought to have had family links on both banks of the Swan River, and perhaps as far south as the Murray. During 1834 he began to work for the police and by February 1835 he was officially attached to the Mounted Police under Norcott. In 1838 he was aboard HMS Beagle, under Wickham, when it sailed north to collect George Grey’s Kimberley expedition. In 1841 he was serving as a native constable in Perth.

Mokare (d.1831). An Aboriginal of King George Sound. Mokare established and maintained good relations with the Europeans, especially Nind, Barker and Collie. He accompanied Wilson on his exploration north-west of King George Sound in December 1829, Barker on his exploration of the Wilson Inlet area in February 1830, Barker again on his trip in June 1830 to West Cape Howe, and was with Collie in April 1831.

Molloy, John (1780-1867). An army officer and heroic veteran of the Napoleonic wars, Captain Molloy arrived in 1830, and soon after founded the settlement of Augusta, at the mouth of the Blackwood River. Molloy made numerous trips around the Augusta area. He served as Resident Magistrate there and also at the Vasse, to where he moved in 1839. His wife, Georgiana (1805-43), is remembered for her correspondence and her botanical collecting.

Mongo-wort. An Aboriginal man from the vicinity of Kalgan River. He was encountered by Roe in February 1835 during an expedition north of King George Sound.

Mooney, Lawrence (1809-96). A private of the 21st Regiment. Mooney accompanied the Monkey expedition in the winter of 1834. He left the regiment to settle in Albany where he served as a policeman for many years.

Moore, George Fletcher (1798-1886). An Irish lawyer who arrived in late 1830 to take up a grant at Upper Swan. Moore was appointed a Commissioner of the Civil Court in February 1832.  He then became Advocate-General in 1834, an appointment that made him a member of the Legislative and Executive Councils. Moore accompanied Dale to the Avon in 1831 and undertook other explorations to the north of Swan River in the mid-1830s. He left the colony in 1852 and did not return. He is best known for his Dairy of Ten Years (1884), a compilation of his letters and diaries from the 1830s.

Mopie. An Aboriginal, possibly the man recorded as ‘Mo-pe’ by George Grey in 1839 and as ‘Mopy’ on the 1842 census. He accompanied Alfred Hillman on his July 1833 expedition to Nornalup.

Morgan, John (1792-1866). Arrived on the Parmelia in June 1829 to take up the position of Government Storekeeper on Garden Island. Morgan was a Justice of the Peace and Government Resident at Perth.  He accompanied J.S. Roe on his 1832 expedition to York. Morgan authorised the firing squad execution of Midgegooroo in May 1833. He departed for Van Diemen’s Land in 1834.

Murray, General Sir George (1772-1846). Joined the army in 1789 and became famous for his military achievements during the Napoleonic Wars. Murray was Quartermaster General for the Duke of Wellington’s army. He was elected MP for Perthshire in 1823 and became Secretary of State for the Colonies in 1828. Numerous features in various parts of Australia were named for him.

Nakina (also known as Naikennon). An Aboriginal of King George Sound. He was thought to be about 40-50 years of age in 1830. He was the elder brother of Mokare and the most senior man at King George Sound. Nakina accompanied Robert Dale and Raphael Clint to Stirling Ranges in January 1832.

Nind, Isaac Scott (1797-1868). Arrived on the Amity with Major Edmund Lockyer at Albany 1826. A surgeon seconded to the 39th Regiment, he suffered a nervous breakdown and was returned to New South Wales in 1829 and dismissed from the Colonial Medical Service as unfit for duty.

Norcott, Charles Rossmore (1810-38). Arrived in 1830. In 1834, after an unsuccessful fishing venture based on Rottnest, he was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Native Tribes at Guildford. Norcott participated in the fighting at the Battle of Pinjarra (October 1834) and was promoted to Superintendent of Police in 1835. In 1836 he sailed home to Ireland, intending to purchase stock and return to Western Australia, but died there while visiting his family.

Numal. Brother of Wannewar, natives of King George Sound.

Nylarr. A native of King George Sound. He was the father of Yattee.

Ommanney, Henry Mortlock (1817-80). The third son of the Dutch Consul at Yarmouth, Ommanney arrived in the Swan River Colony in August 1830. By February 1832 he was working as a clerk in the Survey Office and in November of that year was appointed Assistant Surveyor at York. He commanded the Monkey expedition in July-September, 1834.  In 1835 he made an expedition east of Northam.  Apart from these expeditions he was also with Roe on his 1832 trip to York.  After a visit to England (1836-38) he returned to Western Australia to marry Elizabeth Bussell and was again appointed Assistant Surveyor. In 1842 he became the Civil Administrator at Picton.  He left for England in 1847.

Pace, Walter M. As captain of the Medina he first visited the colony in July 1830, returning to settle in 1832. Pace was Master of the Monkey, which was chartered to search for a shipwreck north of Swan River in the winter of 1834.

Peel, Thomas (1793-1865). Peel was the promoter of large migration scheme that saw the establishment of white settlement in the Murray District but otherwise failed, thus giving the Swan River Colony a tarnished reputation with investors throughout the 1830s. He was a cousin of Sir Robert Peel, the founder of the English constabulary. Peel was a member of the 1834 expedition to Pinjarra in which ‘the natives were punished’.

Phillips, John Randall (1790s-1852). Arrived in the Swan River Colony in 1830 and took up land on the Canning River. Phillips was a member of the 1835 Hotham Expedition. He was Resident Magistrate at Albany 1840-47.

Pike, William (b.1807). A sailor on HMS Sulphur. Pike accompanied Lt Preston on his coastal explorations north of Perth in November 1830.  In April 1831 he was a member of Preston’s party that made an expedition in a whale boat along the south coast to Augusta and then walked to the Murray River.  He was listed as absconded but probably left with the Sulphur in 1832.

Power, James (d. 1845). A private of the 21st, he arrived with his regiment aboard the Isabella in September 1833. Power accompanied the Monkey expedition northwards in the winter of 1834. He was stationed at York where he assisted in survey work. He left with his regiment for India in 1840.

Preston, William. Son of an Admiral, he entered the Royal Navy in 1812. Preston served in the North Sea, West Indies and North American stations, attaining the rank of Lieutenant in 1823. Serving on HMS Success, he accompanied Stirling on his 1827 exploration of the Swan River. He returned to Western Australia as an officer on HMS Sulphur in June 1829. Preston was Master of the colonial schooner Ellen in 1831. He undertook several expeditions before returning to England with HMS Sulphur in August 1832. He was made Commander in 1833 and Captain in 1841. In 1833 he married Hamilla Mary, sister of Ellen Stirling, and youngest daughter of James Mangles, MP.

Riley, W.E. Arrived January 1830 on the Wanstead.  Riley was with W.T. Jay on his overland trip from Fremantle to Port Leschenault and return. He left on the same ship in March 1830.

Roe, John Septimus. See introduction.

Salkilld, Thomas (1805-80). Arrived with J.W. Turner in March 1830. Salkilld settled at Augusta for five years during which time he accompanied Thomas Turner on an exploration of the Blackwood River.  In 1837 he returned to England to marry. He came back to Western Australia and settled in Perth, where he became a police constable.

Sams, William (Richard) Gardner. Arrived October 1829 on the Lotus. Sams was a public notary and agent for Latour. He was granted 4,500 acres in the Leschenault District. In January 1830 he was with Captain Bamber and Charles Smith on a trip to the Collie River.  On 2 March 1830 applied for permission to go to Tasmania and departed on the Wanstead.

Scott, John (1796-1880). Arrived with family in March 1831 as servant of H.G. Smith. Scott accompanied Smith on an expedition to Northam in October 1834.

Seymour, William. A member of the carpenter’s crew on HMS Sulphur.  Seymour was a member of Preston’s party that made an expedition in a whale boat along the south coast to Augusta and then walked to the Murray River in 1831.

Shaw, Nathaniel Chapman (1816-52). Son of William Shaw of Belvoir, Upper Swan. He arrived with his parents in February 1830. In January 1834 he accompanied G.F. Moore in an attempt to trace the Swan to its junction with the Avon.  Shaw further examined the Darling Range north of the York Road in May 1835.

Shenton, William Kernott (1802-42). Arrived on the Lotus in October 1829 and selected land at Leschenault. In January 1831 Shenton explored the Collie River. He was part owner of the Perth Gazette and built the South Perth mill. He drowned on a voyage to Bunbury.

Sheridan, Terence. A private of the 63rd Regiment, he arrived on HMS Sulphur in June 1829 and apparently left when his regiment was transferred to India in 1834. Sheridan was employed in survey work and he accompanied Dale on nearly all of the latter’s explorations.

Sholl, Richard (1786-1836). Served as Purser on HMS Nightingale in 1806 and later held the same office on HMS Semiramis. Sholl came to Western Australia as purser of HMS Sulphur. He was the uncle of Robert John Sholl (1819-86) who was the editor of The Inquirer and the first Government Resident North District.

Simmons, Dr Charles (1802-31). Arrived with the Parmelia in June 1829 as the first Colonial Surgeon. Simmonds was granted land on the Avon. He accompanied Mark Currie and James Drummond southward of Fremantle in July-August 1829.

Skottowe, Thomas R. A Volunteer 1st Class on HMS Sulphur and also listed as a midshipman.  Skottowe was with Preston on his coastal explorations north of Perth in November 1830.  In April 1831 he was a member of Preston’s party that made an expedition in a whale boat along the south coast to Augusta and then walked to the Murray River.

Sleeman, George. A lieutenant of 39th Regiment.  Sleeman was Collet Barker’s predecessor at Raffles Bay and then King George Sound, which he commanded from December 1828 until December 1829. 

Smith, Andrew Adam (1794-1849). A blacksmith who arrived with family in March 1830.  Smith was an indentured servant of James Woodward Turner at Augusta. He joined John Bussell on his expedition from Augusta to Perth in March 1831. Smith later moved to Perth where he was drowned while crossing the Swan River.

Smith, Hugh George (1809-c.1842). An agriculturalist who arrived in March 1831.  Smith was granted land on the Avon and Swan rivers. He engaged in a fishing venture based on Rottnest. Smith and six others made an expedition from Greenmount to Northam in October 1834.

Smythe, George Douglas (b.1806). Arrived with his parents in December 1829. Smythe accompanied Bannister on the December 1830-January 1831 journey to King George Sound, and although his inexperience was blamed for the expedition becoming lost, he was appointed Assistant Surveyor in February 1832. He was appointed to Albany in May 1834 and was last listed as an Assistant Surveyor in 1837. His father, a surveyor, went on to Van Diemen’s Land in February 1831. His brother, Henry W. (b.1813), also worked in the Survey Office. Brother-in-law of Thomas Watson.

Sta(u)nton, John (1794-1877). A veteran of the Peninsula War and Waterloo, Stanton came to Western Australia as a private of 63rd Regiment, arriving on HMS Sulphur in June 1829. He was discharged in the colony and joined the mounted police.  He accompanied Roe on the 1835 expedition to and from King George Sound.

Stirling, Andrew (1818-44). Arrived in the colony in 1834. Stirling was Clerk to the Governor from July 1835.  He accompanied Governor Stirling on an expedition overland to Albany in October 1835.  Stirling was Clerk to the Legislative Council from March 1837 and became a Member of Executive Council from April 1841.

Stirling, James. See introduction.

Stirling, William (1799-31). A cousin of James Stirling.  He arrived with his party on the Parmelia in June 1829. Stirling was the Registrar of the Board of Audit and Control. He accompanied Dale east of Avon in October-November 1830, when Mt Stirling was named in his honour.

Stone, Alfred Hawes (1801-73). Arrived in 1829 intending to take up farming, but became Clerk of the Magistrates Court. He accompanied Dale on an exploration of the York area in September 1831. Stone served for many years in various judicial offices, including Master of the Supreme Court. Stone and his brother, George, were also influential figures in the colony’s business community. In 1868 his youngest daughter married Governor Hampton’s only son.

Symers, Thomas Lyell (1797-1884). A ship’s captain who had spent time in India, he arrived in Albany in June 1835. Symers accompanied Roe on the Sally Ann expedition to Doubtful Island Bay in late 1835. He was a ship builder and trader to the Far East.  Symers became a leading identity in Albany in the 1850s.

Syred, George (c.1810). Arrived in the colony in February 1830. Syred served as a police constable 1834-41. He accompanied Roe on the 1835 expedition to and from King George Sound. He later farmed at Upper Swan and held pastoral leases at Bolgart, where he engaged in sandalwood cutting.

Talbot, Samuel Neil (b.1799). Arrived in October 1829 and obtained land in the Helena District. Talbot joined Dr Wilson and others in examining the Canning in October 1829. One of the ‘gentleman volunteers’ who accompanied Stirling and Roe’s expedition to the Collie and Preston Rivers in March 1830. He left for Van Diemen’s Land in November 1830 and returned several times over following decade.

Tallemach(e), George. The Storekeeper at King George Sound from February 1827 until December 1828. He accompanied Captain Wakefield and eight others to the Porongurup Range in March 1828.

Talpar. An Aborigine encountered by Barker in the vicinity of Denmark in February 1830.

Tanner, William (1801-45). A prosperous settler who arrived with his family and servants in February 1831. Tanner selected land on the Swan and the Avon rivers. He spent time in Van Diemen’s Land and England in the mid-1830s before returning to Western Australia in 1838. He left the colony in 1844.

Taylor, Patrick (1807-77). Arrived in Albany in June 1834. Taylor held pastoral leases near Albany and established an orchard at his property, Candyup.  He explored areas to the north and west of King George Sound in mid-1835. Taylor was Chairman of Albany Quarter Sessions in 1853.

Thompson, Douglas (1798-1835). Arrived in October 1829 and obtained land in partnership with his cousin, Spencer Trimmer, on the Swan and Avon rivers. He drowned in the Swan River, at Guildford, in the winter of 1835.

Toby, Jacob. Arrived aboard the Egyptian or Sterling in 1831. Toby was a master mariner who served as pilot and Harbour Master from 1832. He was commander of the colonial schooner Ellen, which he took north to search for a missing vessel, the Mercury, in November 1834. Toby left for Mauritius aboard the Skerne in August 1835.

Toole-cut-wallee (also known as Tulicatwali and Toolingat-Wally). An Aboriginal man of King George Sound, first recorded in 1829. He accompanied Roe on the initial stages of the December 1835 expedition from Albany to York.

Townsend, Henry (1811-77). A farmer and grazier at King River, Albany. Townsend accompanied Patrick Taylor on an expedition in the West Cape Howe area in June 1835.

Trimmer, Arthur (1807-77). Brother of Spencer. Arthur arrived in Western Australia in April 1831 and selected land at York. He was with Stirling on an expedition to King George Sound in October 1835. In 1836 married Mary Ann, one of Sir Richard Spencer’s daughters.

Trimmer, Spencer (1803-43). Brother of Arthur. Spencer arrived in October 1829 and obtained land in partnership with his cousin, Douglas Thompson, on the Swan and Avon rivers. He explored the Avon with Bland and Agett in 1834.

Turner, George (b.1816). Son of James Woodward Turner and younger brother of Thomas, who he accompanied on his 1834 expedition to trace the course of the lower Blackwood. Turner possibly moved to South Australia in 1864.

Turner, James Woodward (1780-1862). A London businessman who arrived in the colony in 1830.  Turner accompanied Stirling on his 1830 expedition to Augusta and selected 20,000 acres there. He moved to Perth and set up as general dealer in 1847.

Turner, Thomas (1813-1895). Son of James Woodward Turner. He worked with his parents at Augusta until 1833, then with his younger brothers until 1837. In September 1834 Turner traced the course of the lower Blackwood. He worked as a surveyor in the south-west. In 1840 he leased land at Dunsborough and moved to Victoria in 1852.

Vancouver, Captain George (1757-1798). Vancouver sailed with Captain James Cook on his second and third voyages. He visited and named King George Sound (as King George the Third’s Sound) in HM Sloop Discovery and HM Tender Chatham from 30 September – 12 October 1791, taking possession of the entire south coast of New Holland for Britain, before sailing on to New Zealand and Canada. He was promoted post Captain in 1794.

Wakefield, Joseph. Captain of the 39th Regiment.  Wakefield arrived at King George Sound with Lockyer in December 1826 and became Commander of the settlement from April 1827 to December 1828. He undertook a short excursion to the north of King George Sound in March 1828.

Wannewar. See Wou-o-wor.

Watson, Thomas (b.1806). Arrived in December 1829 and selected land on the Avon and at Cockburn Sound. Watson was appointed clerk to the Colonial Secretary in late 1831 and held other Government clerical posts over the next few years. In October 1835 he explored and partly surveyed the Murray River as far upstream as the Darling escarpment. Watson was a farmer and innkeeper at Mandurah (his wife was the postmistress). He was contracted to build a road from Fremantle to Dandalup in 1841. Watson was the brother-in-law of George Smythe. He moved to South Australia in 1850.

Weeilbarra (also known as Weelban, Weelbap, Weelbar and Wilbro). An Aboriginal man of the Gingin area, whose country was visited by Moore and his party in April 1835.

Weeip (also known as Weep, Weeup. Weyup, Wiap, Wiup, Wyap, Wyip and Wyup). Weeip was a senior Aboriginal man of the area north of Upper Swan. He was known to Moore from at least 1833. Weeip associated with Yagan and was one of the group who speared William Keats in retaliation for the shooting of Yagan. The soldier Denis Larkin was also thought to have been speared by Weeip. He was eventually pardoned when he endeavoured to contact shipwrecked Europeans somewhere north of Perth. Weeip was present when Moore attended Gigat’s corroboree in April 1835. Weeip accompanied Roe in searching for Grey’s party north of Perth in 1839.

Weenit. (also known as Weenat, Winat). An Aboriginal of the Upper Swan region. Weenit accompanied H.G. Smith to the Northam region in October 1834 and Moore in March 1836 to the Moore River.

Weneet (also known as Winnett). An Aboriginal man from Upper Swan who accompanied Nathaniel Shaw when he examined the Darling Range north of the York road in May 1835. He was the brother of Durabab.

Whitfield, Francis (1777-1857). Arrived in the colony in 1830. Whitfield was the Resident Magistrate and Storekeeper at Guildford. He obtained land grants on the Swan and at Toodyay. He traced the Helena River to its source in 1833.

Wilson, Doctor Thomas Braidwood (1792-1843). A Royal Naval Surgeon (appointed 17 August 1815) who served in the Napoleonic Wars before the first of nine visits, as Surgeon Superintendent on convict ships, to New South Wales in 1822. Wilson visited Western Australia in 1829 and took part in several short expeditions. Wilson Inlet on the South coast is named after him.

Wittenoom, Rev. John Burdett (1789-1855). Colonial chaplain. Wittenoom arrived in January 1830. He accompanied Stirling and Dale to the Avon District in October 1830.  He was granted land near Beverley. A former headmaster in England, he was active in fostering education in the colony.

Woods, Private Thomas. Brother of William and formerly of the NSW Royal Veterans Corps. Woods arrived on the Amity at Albany with his wife Sarah. He was the overseer of convicts at the military establishment under Major Lockyer. Woods returned to New South Wales on 6 December 1828 on the Governor Phillips.

Woods, Private William. Brother of Thomas and formerly of the NSW Royal Veterans Corps. Woods arrived on the Amity at Albany with his wife Ann. He was governor of convicts at the military establishment under Major Edmund Lockyer. He returned to New South Wales 6 December 1828 on the Governor Phillips.

Woodward, Thomas. A convict at King George Sound. Woodward was born at Northampton c.1806. He escaped from King George Sound in January 1830 and was not recaptured.

Wou-o-wor (also known as Wannewar, Wannua and Winneawar). An Aboriginal man of King George Sound who accompanied Roe on the initial stages of the December 1835 expedition from Albany to York.

Yule, Thomas Newte (1803-68). Arrived in May 1830 from India. Yule obtained land at Toodyay, on the Canning River, and the Swan. In 1837 he married Dr Joseph Harris’s daughter, Lucy, who died in childbirth the following year. He was appointed an MLC in 1841 and Protector of Natives at York in 1843. Yule settled in Toodyay in 1845 but was burnt out and, in 1851, became Perth Police Magistrate. He retired to England in 1862.

REFERENCES

Books

Appleyard, R. T. & Manford, T., The Beginning: European Discovery and Early Settlement of Swan River, Western Australia, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1979.

Bassett, M., The Hentys: An Australian Colonial Tapestry, Oxford University Press, London, 1954.

Berryman, I., A Colony Detailed: the First Census of Western Australia, 1832, Creative Research, Perth, 1979.

Blackburn, G., Conquest and Settlement: The 21st Regiment of Foot (North British Fusiliers) in Western Australia, 1833-40, Hesperian Press, Carlisle, Western Australia,1999.

Bryan, C. P., “Cygnet” The Story of HMS Success (1823-1849), Perth, 1935.

Cameron, J.M.R., Ambition’s Fire: the Agricultural Colonization of Pre-convict Western Australia, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1981.

Cannon, M & MacFarlane, I., Historical Records of Victoria, vol 6: The Crown, the Land and the Squatter, 1835-1840, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 1991.

Carment, Maynard & Powell, NT Dictionary of Biography, vol 1., Darwin, 1990.

Chapman, B., The Colonial Eye: a Topographical and Artistic Record of the Life and Landscape of Western Australia, 1798-1914, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 1979.

Erickson, R. (ed.), Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians, vols 1-4, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1987 and 1988.

Green, N. (ed.), Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians, vol 6: Aborigines of the Albany Region 1821-1898, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1989.

Hallam, S. & Tilbrook, L., Aborigines of the Southwest Region 1829-1840, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1990.

Henderson, G., Unfinished Voyages: Western Australian Shipwrecks, 1622-1850, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1980.

MacDermott, M., A Brief Sketch of the Long and Varied Career of Marshall MacDermott, Adelaide, 1874.

Moore, G.F., Diary of Ten Years Eventful Life of an Early Settler in Western Australia; and also a descriptive vocabulary of the language of the Aborigines, M. Walbrook, London, 1884.

Mulvaney, J. & Green, N., Commandant of Solitude: the Journals of Captain Collet Barker, 1828-1831, Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 1992.

O’Byrne, W. R., A Naval Biographical Dictionary: Comprising the Life and Services of Every Living Officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the Rank of Admiral of the Fleet to that of Lieutenant, inclusive. Compiled from Authentic and Family Documents, J. Murray, London, 1849.

Pike, D. (ed.), Australian Dictionary of Biography, vols 1 & 2, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 1966 and 1967.

Statham, P., Dictionary of Western Australians 1829-1914: vol 1, Early Settlers 1829-1850, University of Western Australia Press, Nedlands, 1979.

Sweetman, J., The Military Establishment and Penal Settlement at King George Sound, Hesperian Press, Carlisle, Western Australia, 1989.

Uren, M., Land Looking West: the Story of Governor James Stirling in Western Australia, Oxford University Press, London, 1948.

Newspapers

Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal 1833-35.

Personal Communications

Epton, Kim. Research, Perth, Western Australia.

Milentis, Sheryl. Archival Research, Perth, Western Australia.

Phillips, Michael. Plymouth Naval Dockyard Museum, citing British Navy Lists.

Shoobert, Joanne. Archival Research, Perth, Western Australia.

Archives

Moore, George Fletcher, Letters and Journals 1830-1848, Battye Library Acc 263A.

Records of the Colonial Secretary’s Office and of the Survey Office, State Records Office of Western Australia.

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